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Management

This activity counts towards the activities category.

For this activity you will use a simple process from your own life: preparing a family meal for a large family. This process is designed to help you recognize how eliminating waste, particularly transportation waste, can make processes easier and eliminate the inefficient layouts.
The first step in appraising any situation, is to stop and ask yourself “What bothers me about this”? In the case of an existing business operation, it is helpful to gain an appreciation for the current state, not only in terms of the relative position of the equipment, but the nature of the environment as well. Is it noisy? Are people rushing around from machine to machine? Are their hands full? As they move through the facility, are they taking a circuitous route around infrequently used machines or stacks of inventory? Are the aisles wide enough for the traffic? The best vantage point to observe the work environment is from ceiling level. A scissor lift or tall ladder can provide a very different perspective to an otherwise familiar situation. Safety is, of course, paramount.
Activity Grading
This activity counts towards the Activities category. It is graded on pass/fail basis. If you complete all components of the activity on time, you will receive a pass. You will also receive qualitative feedback from your instructor about your completed activity.
It is recognized that the Activities category only counts for 5% of your overall course grade, which is not substantial considering that there are five activities to be completed within it. You will, however, benefit from completing each activity when it comes to your Major Assignment. Your Major Assignment requires that three different tools/diagrams be included. Receiving feedback from your instructor about the construction of this spaghetti diagram now will assist you in producing a higher-quality Major Assignment.
Activity Instructions
Part 1: Creating and Analyzing Your Diagram
Make a floor plan of the work area using graph paper (there are many websites where you can print graph paper from, if need be). In this case, the work area may be your kitchen. Be sure the area is drawn in “plan view” (as you would see it from above), showing where the equipment is located. It is critical that you draw the area to scale. Some drawing tips/procedures:
Draw a rectangle that is proportional to your work area, centered on the paper. Place the columns on your drawing first. These are helpful as reference points for placing your equipment. Remember to divide the actual dimensions, in your measurement unit of choice (i.e. feet, meters), by the drawing scale to convert each dimension to measurements on your drawing.
Next, place each piece of equipment on your drawing. It is enough to represent each piece with a rectangle with dimensions equal to the maximum length and width of the machine. Keep in mind that you are interested in the open space between pieces of equipment, so be sure that your rectangle encapsulates the full reach of the work area (including guards, arms, etc.), not just the footprint of the base of the object/machine.
Note in each rectangle where the operator is located.
Label each rectangle with the name of the equipment.
Be sure to add all of the fixed storage locations and piles of inventory, spare parts, waste, garbage receptacles, etc., that are barriers to moving around. Check your dimensions frequently.
Make a few photocopies of your drawing, so that you can preserve your hard work for future use or in the case that you make an error and need to restart.
On a copy of your layout drawing, draw a line that follows each operator involved in your process as they go about their work. Use a different colour for each operator. Create a legend so you can keep track of which colour refers to which operator. Be patient while you observe the movements of your operators, if you are actually observing the work being done. You want to draw the whole path that each operator must follow from the time they become involved in the process until the process is complete.
In each case, either the material streams or the operator paths will create a series of overlapping and criss-crossing lines that will resemble a plate of spaghetti. This is an excellent visual representation of the distance traveled. In particular, it will illustrate the number of times a line of a particular colour crosses itself, indicating when equipment and/or storage locations are placed in the wrong order in relation to the sequence of operations of your process.
The issues that are illustrated in the spaghetti diagram represent improvement operations for consideration.
Using a Microsoft Word document, create a one-page list of the issues that you noticed in your operation while drawing the spaghetti diagram.
Comments from Customer
Discipline: Lean System

Categories
Management

Customer is an international student.

Notes:
I am an international student and English is not my native language. The writer please use simple words and sentences.
Comments from Customer
Customer is an international student. Please, provide a regular grammatically correct, well-structured paper according to the instructions and academic context provided, written with simple sentence structures and easy vocabulary (or shortly, use simple English).

Categories
Management

Everything is clear for this assignment.

Everything is clear for this assignment. I’ve also uploaded images of the quiz that I did to help you for this assignment.

Categories
Management

Draw a cause and effect (fishbone) diagram to try to find the possible causes for this situation.

Book: Quality Management for Organizational Excellence by David L. Goetsch, Stanley Davi. Prentice Hall, 2021. Attached is the 8th edition
Refer to Goetsch & Davis, Chapters 5 and 15
Assignment 2:
1.- The Fishbone Diagram
“On a construction site, the job is clearly behind schedule. Discussion with the workers points to problems with having materials ready when needed. Some of the materials in the supply trailer seem to be of the wrong sizes – such as piping and fittings. It takes a long time to get the materials each day, and workers are held back”.
Draw a Cause and Effect (Fishbone) diagram to try to find the possible causes for this situation. Start with an observed effect “Material supply problems”
Show possible causes on 5 bones of the chart. These should be labeled: Materials, Workers, Methods, Equipment, and Environment. Show at least 4 causes on each bone.
Brainstorm on the problem, then list the ideas. Work from the list to sketch the basic structure of the chart, then add the ideas to the chart as possible causes.
Write a short summary to suggest specific ideas on how the findings from the chart may be used to improve the materials problem
2.- Five-S application:
Discuss a construction project one of you may be involved in, or may have observed at some time. Explain briefly how you think Five-S could be used to improve the project, and what results could be expected.

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Management

Then review the other two example documents.

For this assignment, start by reviewing the Decision Matrix, Force Field, Troll Search Assignment document. This document contains a video link for how to complete this assignment. Then review the other two example documents.

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Management

Remember, these deliverables can be tangible or intangible project results.

Write an executive summary
Under Executive Summary, write 1-3 sentences outlining the project’s purpose and desired outcomes.
For example, if you were writing an executive summary for the Plant Pals project as a whole, it might say:
“Our plan is to create a service that offers high-volume customers small, low-maintenance plants that can thrive in an office environment.”
Your summary for the Operations and Training plan charter should follow a similar format.
Step 3: Fill in the project goal
In the Project Goal section of the charter, record the main project goal of the Operations and Training plan. This goal should be more detailed and specific than your executive summary. Use the information from the scenario to make the goal SMART (Specific, Measurable, Attainable, Relevant, Time-bound).
For example, one of the SMART goals for the overall Plant Pals project is:
“Increase revenue by 5% by the end of the year by rolling out a new service that provides office plants to top clients.”
Note: Most projects have multiple goals, but you only need one for this activity.
Step 4: Identify the project deliverables
In the Deliverables box, record three expected outcomes of the project. Remember, these deliverables can be tangible or intangible project results.
For instance, one tangible deliverable of the overall Plant Pals project is, “send 1,000 plants to 100 customers.” An intangible deliverable could be, “increased brand awareness.”
Step 5: Determine the business case for the project
In the Business Case/ Background section, explain the reason for the project and how it supports the company’s overall success. Making a business case also gives your team the necessary context for project tasks, so be sure to include any useful background information as well.
For example, the business case for the overall Plant Pals project might be, “This is a top requested service from our customers, and it will also improve customer satisfaction and retention.”
Step 6: Fill in the benefits and cost areas (optional)
The Benefits, Costs, and Budget section already includes three benefits of the project, three cost areas, and the budget amount. If you would like, you can fill in any additional benefits or cost areas from the scenario. This section of the charter is optional and will not be graded.
For benefits, describe what Office Green hopes to get out of the project. This can include direct financial benefits (e.g., sales revenue), as well as indirect benefits (e.g., increased customer trust). Remember that the benefits should support your business case.
For costs, think about how the completing project could impact the company. Consider time and resources in addition to any financial impact.
Note: You don’t need to assign monetary values to these cost areas in this exercise. You will break down the costs of the Plant Pals Operations and Training Plan project in detail in the next course, Project Planning: Putting It All Together.)
Step 7: Define the project scope (optional)
The Scope and Exclusion section already contains three areas that are in-scope and two that are out-of-scope for the project. If you want to further define the scope, you can fill in additional in-scope and out-of-scope items. This section of the charter is optional and will not be graded.
Note: The charter should also list the members of your project team. This section has been filled out for you.
Step 8: Determine how to measure success
In the Measuring Success section, list two examples of success criteria that can help you determine when the project has reached its goal. You can use criteria from the scenario or determine other ways to measure project success. Remember that success criteria should be specific and measurable.
For instance, success criteria for Plant Pals as a whole could include “a 5% increase in revenue by the end of the year” or “a 5% increase in customer satisfaction (from 90% to 95%) three months after launch.” Both of these criteria include metrics that make it easy to tell when the project has reached its goals.
Comments from Customer
Discipline: Project Management

Categories
Management

Contract and design scope changes

Read the Paper, “What is Good Project Management?” It is a fundamental paper written in 1977. Even though it is older, it is an excellent foundation and written by a man from Brown and Root, Inc. – the original owners of all the buildings at The Alhambra, home of CiAM. For all you know, you may be sitting in the author’s old office! Read the paper and consider the serious lessons it provides concerning the importance of Project Management. https://www.pmi.org/learning/library/what-good-project-management-effectively-successfully-5675 (Links to an external site.)
Throughout your life you have worked on many complex projects: at home, at work, in school, and in your hobbies. You may have a favorite imagined project that you hope to lead and manage in the future. Use one of these as your personal “case study” for this Threaded Discussion.
Select one of the key seven information areas that project managers must know about in managing a project, as discussed in the paper. Discuss your case study from the perspective of the project manager and associated project requirements, teamwork, and success criteria for your selected information area.
1. Personnel and manpower.
2. Contract and design scope changes
3. Equipment and materials
4. Schedules and planned operations
5. Physical progress: quantities in place and to go
6. Costs and manpower expended and for what — to include commitments, cash flow and forecasts.
7. Quality assurance in all design, procurement and construction activities, keyed to management responsibilities at appropriate levels.
How does your approach fit with the quote from Peter Drucker that “A manager must, so to speak, keep his nose to the grindstone whilst lifting his eyes to the hills.”

Categories
Management

Video that helped

base it off this reading, how can you learn from the book and how and why could you use it in design.

video that helped
Comments from Customer
Discipline: strategic design management

Categories
Management

Everything is in the excel file also screenshots are for the last problem please

Everything is in the excel file also screenshots are for the last problem please if this can be done faster please send it to me it should be fast i really need it in 8 hours so if you can do that i can pay extra

Categories
Management

I will need a summary for each source (each summary to be separated).

I have attached a word document that has three sources (three different topics). I will need a summary for each source (each summary to be separated). These three sources must be cited throughout when needed. Please keep in mind that I am taking interior design!!
Comments from Customer
Please, note the discipline is interior design. Discipline: Interior Design