Categories
Communications

Summarize the dimensions and scope of the industry including travel trends and r

Summarize the dimensions and scope of the industry including travel trends and research; and, identify at least 8 sectors of the hospitality industry in which careers can be pursued.
Undertake some research (through the library or other citable resources besides your textbook) to find and share 1) an example of an international trend and 2) an example of an intercultural issue that are impacting careers in the global hospitality, travel or tourism business sector you intend to pursue. Then, share your thoughts on how you may be able to mitigate (minimize) the effect of the trend and issue on your career prospects. Identify the type of hospitality, travel or tourism business you’re considering when stating your thoughts.
Be sure to cite the source of the information you are referencing using APA guidelines. American Psychological Association (2020). APA publication manual (7th ed,). Washington, D.C.
Comments from Customer
Discipline: Hospitality

Categories
Communications

Summarize the dimensions and scope of the industry including travel trends and r

Summarize the dimensions and scope of the industry including travel trends and research; and, identify at least 8 sectors of the hospitality industry in which careers can be pursued.
Undertake some research (through the library or other citable resources besides your textbook) to find and share 1) an example of an international trend and 2) an example of an intercultural issue that are impacting careers in the global hospitality, travel or tourism business sector you intend to pursue. Then, share your thoughts on how you may be able to mitigate (minimize) the effect of the trend and issue on your career prospects. Identify the type of hospitality, travel or tourism business you’re considering when stating your thoughts.
Be sure to cite the source of the information you are referencing using APA guidelines. American Psychological Association (2020). APA publication manual (7th ed,). Washington, D.C.
Comments from Customer
Discipline: Hospitality

Categories
Communications

my topic is “Descriptive research vs analytic research” , explain both and diffe

my topic is “Descriptive research vs analytic research” , explain both and differentiate. It has to be two pages.
Students should research on the selected topic regarding any research methods, concepts, and theories. You should
research (1) definition, (2) usage, (3) examples, (4) analysis, and (5) other relevant information

Categories
Communications

my topic is “Descriptive research vs analytic research” , explain both and diffe

my topic is “Descriptive research vs analytic research” , explain both and differentiate. It has to be two pages.
Students should research on the selected topic regarding any research methods, concepts, and theories. You should
research (1) definition, (2) usage, (3) examples, (4) analysis, and (5) other relevant information

Categories
Communications

This semester, instead of writing a Research Paper, students will be completing

This semester, instead of writing a Research Paper, students will be completing a Research Project.
What is the difference? Instead of writing a 10–15-page research paper, students will conduct research, document and summarize that research, and produce a visual “info-graphic”.
MY CI SECTOR IS Transportation Systems Sector

Categories
Communications

How/when/what to submit: You’ll need to read the assigned reading (read strategi

How/when/what to submit:
You’ll need to read the assigned reading (read strategically – focusing on the things that are new to you and/or that you think apply to you personally as a speaker) and post your thoughts to canvas no later than the deadline listed in canvas.
What to write about:
These responses are open-ended so you can write about whatever you want or need to, but earnest effort to produce an academic examination of the text or material is expected. For example, your discussion prep could detail your reaction to the text, address some problematic or puzzling aspect of the text, discuss an aspect of the reading that you found particularly interesting, and/or simply relate the reading to previous information or experiences you have encountered. If, after the reading, you were left with more questions than answers, then discuss those – maybe try searching out additional information from other texts or online.
At a minimum, your response should identify what you read in the text (and where you found it in the text), show that you understood it (or are able to ask educated questions about it), and show that you can apply this new knowledge to a public speaking situation (for example, “in high school I gave a speech and ____ happened” or “I can see this applying to speeches I might have to give in the workplace because _____” or any other way you can connect what you read to “the real world”)..
You do not necessarily need to summarize the work for us (or provide unnecessary definitions), but if it helps your response, then include them. Even if we read the same thing you did, we don’t know your take on it. So, one of your chief responsibilities is to explain your thinking to us clearly, concisely, and convincingly (i.e. use examples, be as brief as possible without compromising the integrity of your thoughts, and use quotes/examples from the reading(s) to strengthen or clarify your position).
Response length & grading:
These are submitted as discussion posts so you might want to write and save them in a word processing program like MS word first and then copy-paste into Canvas to submit (that way you don’t have to worry about any technical issues).
These don’t need to be novels but they do need to be thorough. Make sure your response is 100-150 words per chapter in the assignment (so 1 well-formed paragraph per chapter). If there are multiple chapters in a reading assignment, you should address each chapter individually (you can do this by responding 2 each chapter individually in one post or make a separate post for each chapter).
https://docs.google.com/presentation/d/1lAHGITkBZFzPe7es4SycQzIsq_QGKqd74_FauiiiEII/mobilepresent?slide=id.g1dafafe93c_0_0
https://socialsci.libretexts.org/Bookshelves/Communication/Public_Speaking/Public_Speaking_(The_Public_Speaking_Project)/11%3A_Speaking_with_Confidence
Required to watch: https://blog.ted.com/required-watching-for-any-ted-speaker-the-science-of-stage-fright/
Optional to watch: https://www.ted.com/talks/amy_cuddy_your_body_language_may_shape_who_you_are?language=en

Categories
Communications

How/when/what to submit: You’ll need to read the assigned reading (read strategi

How/when/what to submit:
You’ll need to read the assigned reading (read strategically – focusing on the things that are new to you and/or that you think apply to you personally as a speaker) and post your thoughts to canvas no later than the deadline listed in canvas.
What to write about:
These responses are open-ended so you can write about whatever you want or need to, but earnest effort to produce an academic examination of the text or material is expected. For example, your discussion prep could detail your reaction to the text, address some problematic or puzzling aspect of the text, discuss an aspect of the reading that you found particularly interesting, and/or simply relate the reading to previous information or experiences you have encountered. If, after the reading, you were left with more questions than answers, then discuss those – maybe try searching out additional information from other texts or online.
At a minimum, your response should identify what you read in the text (and where you found it in the text), show that you understood it (or are able to ask educated questions about it), and show that you can apply this new knowledge to a public speaking situation (for example, “in high school I gave a speech and ____ happened” or “I can see this applying to speeches I might have to give in the workplace because _____” or any other way you can connect what you read to “the real world”)..
You do not necessarily need to summarize the work for us (or provide unnecessary definitions), but if it helps your response, then include them. Even if we read the same thing you did, we don’t know your take on it. So, one of your chief responsibilities is to explain your thinking to us clearly, concisely, and convincingly (i.e. use examples, be as brief as possible without compromising the integrity of your thoughts, and use quotes/examples from the reading(s) to strengthen or clarify your position).
Response length & grading:
These are submitted as discussion posts so you might want to write and save them in a word processing program like MS word first and then copy-paste into Canvas to submit (that way you don’t have to worry about any technical issues).
These don’t need to be novels but they do need to be thorough. Make sure your response is 100-150 words per chapter in the assignment (so 1 well-formed paragraph per chapter). If there are multiple chapters in a reading assignment, you should address each chapter individually (you can do this by responding 2 each chapter individually in one post or make a separate post for each chapter).
https://docs.google.com/presentation/d/1lAHGITkBZFzPe7es4SycQzIsq_QGKqd74_FauiiiEII/mobilepresent?slide=id.g1dafafe93c_0_0
https://socialsci.libretexts.org/Bookshelves/Communication/Public_Speaking/Public_Speaking_(The_Public_Speaking_Project)/11%3A_Speaking_with_Confidence
Required to watch: https://blog.ted.com/required-watching-for-any-ted-speaker-the-science-of-stage-fright/
Optional to watch: https://www.ted.com/talks/amy_cuddy_your_body_language_may_shape_who_you_are?language=en

Categories
Communications

2 papers each 200-300 words explained that there is an assignment prompt and the

2 papers each 200-300 words
explained that there is an assignment prompt and the grading rubric in the pictures. Paper instructions slides are numbered.
Comments from Customer
Discipline: Media and communications

Categories
Communications

Extended Response Journal Reflection: Choose one of your weekly response journal

Extended Response Journal Reflection:
Choose one of your weekly response journal reflections (I attached a copy of what I had written for the week I chose to do this assignment on) to expand into a longer length paper/reflection. The revised Journal Reflections posts should be 1250 words (not including bibliography). Your extended refection will include a title page and bibliography. Give your extended reflection a title that conveys its main focus. Your extended reflection must include at least four scholarly references/citations from course material. This is the minimum.
What to pay attention to in the reading(s) for this week:
Dallas Smythe and Stuart Ewen are two significant figures in the study of communication and culture. In 1981, Smythe proposed the idea of the “Audience Commodity.” What this means is that the very act of viewing television, using social media, or even consuming ‘free’ media is not only a consumptive act, but a productive act. Smythe theorized (along Marxist lines) that the surplus value of any given commodity – that which makes a commodity profitable – is the result of human labour (be it culture or manufacturing). Audiences are offered a “free lunch” by media producers (‘free’ television shows, news, and cartoons, or ‘free’ access to social media platforms like Twitter, Facebook, and Tik Tok) and in return audiences offer their attention to these outlets which is then sold to advertises. Smythe writes:
“As with the hors d’oeuvres or potato chips and peanuts given to the customers of the pub, bar, or cocktail lounge, the function of the free lunch is to whet the appetite. In this case, to whet the prospective audience members’ appetites and thus (1) attract and keep them attending to the program, newspaper, or magazine; (2) cultivate a mood conducive to favorable reaction to the advertisers’ explicit and implicit messages. In the policy of the mass media, the characteristics of the free lunch must always be subordinated to those of the formal advertisements, because the purpose of the mass media is to produce audiences to sell to the advertisers” (Smythe in Durham & Kellner, 2012, p. 242).
Meanwhile, Stuart Ewen offers a historical argument about how images work within consumer society as well as some speculations about what some of the political implications of the ever-increasing flow of images might be. Ewen’s work focusses on the ways in which images (photography in particular) have become a necessary component of capitalism and consumer culture, where meaning is paramount in the marketing of goods. He argues that in the postmodern context, meaning remains on the surface of things and that through images anything can mean anything; meaning is no longer fixed to objects or forms. Ewen’s chapter is called “Goods and Surfaces” precisely because, for him, the meaning of anything in the postmodern context is on the surface (be it a product in the mall or a political leader on the screen). Ewen writes: “Where images and things had once connoted one’s place within an immutable network of social relations, they were now emerging as a form of social currency in an increasingly mobile commercial world” (Ewen, 1988, p. 29).
How to approach the content of this week’s video clip:
This week’s video clip problematizes the current landscape of social media and popular culture, a terrain where, as the filmmakers argue, the once distinct lines between product, producer, and consumer are blurred. Some of the key questions to keep in mind as you watch and process the video are: How are audiences turned into a commodity in this culture of “like?” Why is this commodification of audiences described as problematic? What is the relationship between popular and commodification? How is this “culture of like” changing our media industries, specifically advertising and marketing industries? What role does convergence play in this emerging media landscape?
Key terms for this week’s class:
Post modernism
Audience commodity
Free lunch
Differentiation
Meaning and surfaces
Course Material:

Generation Like

The Audience Commodity

Categories
Communications

Extended Response Journal Reflection: Choose one of your weekly response journal

Extended Response Journal Reflection:
Choose one of your weekly response journal reflections (I attached a copy of what I had written for the week I chose to do this assignment on) to expand into a longer length paper/reflection. The revised Journal Reflections posts should be 1250 words (not including bibliography). Your extended refection will include a title page and bibliography. Give your extended reflection a title that conveys its main focus. Your extended reflection must include at least four scholarly references/citations from course material. This is the minimum.
What to pay attention to in the reading(s) for this week:
Dallas Smythe and Stuart Ewen are two significant figures in the study of communication and culture. In 1981, Smythe proposed the idea of the “Audience Commodity.” What this means is that the very act of viewing television, using social media, or even consuming ‘free’ media is not only a consumptive act, but a productive act. Smythe theorized (along Marxist lines) that the surplus value of any given commodity – that which makes a commodity profitable – is the result of human labour (be it culture or manufacturing). Audiences are offered a “free lunch” by media producers (‘free’ television shows, news, and cartoons, or ‘free’ access to social media platforms like Twitter, Facebook, and Tik Tok) and in return audiences offer their attention to these outlets which is then sold to advertises. Smythe writes:
“As with the hors d’oeuvres or potato chips and peanuts given to the customers of the pub, bar, or cocktail lounge, the function of the free lunch is to whet the appetite. In this case, to whet the prospective audience members’ appetites and thus (1) attract and keep them attending to the program, newspaper, or magazine; (2) cultivate a mood conducive to favorable reaction to the advertisers’ explicit and implicit messages. In the policy of the mass media, the characteristics of the free lunch must always be subordinated to those of the formal advertisements, because the purpose of the mass media is to produce audiences to sell to the advertisers” (Smythe in Durham & Kellner, 2012, p. 242).
Meanwhile, Stuart Ewen offers a historical argument about how images work within consumer society as well as some speculations about what some of the political implications of the ever-increasing flow of images might be. Ewen’s work focusses on the ways in which images (photography in particular) have become a necessary component of capitalism and consumer culture, where meaning is paramount in the marketing of goods. He argues that in the postmodern context, meaning remains on the surface of things and that through images anything can mean anything; meaning is no longer fixed to objects or forms. Ewen’s chapter is called “Goods and Surfaces” precisely because, for him, the meaning of anything in the postmodern context is on the surface (be it a product in the mall or a political leader on the screen). Ewen writes: “Where images and things had once connoted one’s place within an immutable network of social relations, they were now emerging as a form of social currency in an increasingly mobile commercial world” (Ewen, 1988, p. 29).
How to approach the content of this week’s video clip:
This week’s video clip problematizes the current landscape of social media and popular culture, a terrain where, as the filmmakers argue, the once distinct lines between product, producer, and consumer are blurred. Some of the key questions to keep in mind as you watch and process the video are: How are audiences turned into a commodity in this culture of “like?” Why is this commodification of audiences described as problematic? What is the relationship between popular and commodification? How is this “culture of like” changing our media industries, specifically advertising and marketing industries? What role does convergence play in this emerging media landscape?
Key terms for this week’s class:
Post modernism
Audience commodity
Free lunch
Differentiation
Meaning and surfaces
Course Material:

Generation Like

The Audience Commodity